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Pteranodon Trail Station, Eastern North America"
Pteranodon
Pteranodon
Meaning Toothless Wing
Height Male: 5.6 meters wingspan Female: 3.8 meters wingspan
Weight Male: 44 lbs Female: 25 lbs
Species Pterosaurs
Home Pterandon Terrance, Western North America

Pteranodon Trail Station, Eastern North America

Time Cretaceous Period
Family Pteranodontidae
Diet Piscivore

Pteranodons were large flying reptiles that lived during the Cretaceous period. They were not dinosaurs but related to dinosaurs. They have a large beak and a long crest above their heads. They have a long fourth finger that makes up the wing. Their bones are hollow which helps them to fly. They may have lived by seaside cliffs to use the wind to glide. Their favorite food is fish. The most notable Pteranodon is the Pteranodon family who lives in Pteranodon Terrace. They lived near the Western Interior Sea in North America.


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  • Pteranodon's portrayal in the show only bears a passing resemblance to its namesake, and closer resembles a generic cartoon "pterodactyl". This contrasts heavily with the other pterosaurs shown in the series, which resemble anthropomorphic versions of their real life counterparts.
    • The most glaring liberty in the design is the depiction of bat-like wings. Real Pteranodon wings were much longer and were only supported by a single finger finger.
  • Two morphs of the species have been found, with one morph having a long crest and another having a short crest. This variation is strongly believed to be a form of sexual dimorphism, with the long-crested morphs representing males and the short-crested morphs representing females.
    • This sexual dimorphism is not depicted by the Pteranodons in the series, and both males and females are represented by the long-crested morph.
  • In real life, Pteranodon has pycnofibers like all pterosaurs
  • Pteranodon also didn't build a bird-like nest in real life.
  • In real life Pteranodon did not live at the same time as Tyrannosaurus rex.
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